Gold Museum’s stater coin from Ancient Greece.

Front of a stater coin from Ancient Greece, 359-336 BC (Gold Museum collection, 76.0144)

Front of a stater coin from Ancient Greece, 359-336 BC (Gold Museum collection, 76.0144)

Obverse of stater coin from Ancient Greece, 359-336 BC (Gold Museum collection, 76.0144)

Obverse of stater coin from Ancient Greece, 359-336 BC (Gold Museum collection, 76.0144)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Gold Museum has a collection of ancient coins from Greece and Rome collected by Ballarat philanthropist Paul Simon.

One item from this collection includes the Greek stater coin from 359-336BC.

Philip II of Macedon appears on this coin. Young and ambitious, Phillip financed his conquest of nearby states by producing coins, called staters, made from gold captured from neighbouring mines.

Phillip was able to conquer his neighbours with a well-trained army and an abundant supply of gold coins.

The size, shape and design of modern Western coins has its origins in Ancient Greece.

The Greek empire extended from around the Black Sea, North Africa, Italy, France and Spain.

Ancient Greece was made up of small city states, where trading become essential. As a result, a currency system was developed.

The stater coin and other historical currency from the Simon collection is currently on display in our Paul & Jessica Simon Gold Pavilion.

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