Melting Pot of Innovation

Horse-Drawn Vehicles on the Victorian Goldfields Until the 1850s, most of the horse-drawn vehicles available to Victorians were either English imports, or locally built and based on English designs. In the English tradition of coachbuilding each wheel, undercarriage and carriage body was made specifically for a single vehicle. As a result, there was great variety […]

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F.W Niven

Francis Wilson Niven was a noted engraver, lithographer and printer based in Ballarat between the 1860s and 1880s. The Gold Museum holds an extensive collection of Niven’s work which highlight the development of Ballarat’s advertising and tourism industries during the gold boom. Niven was born in Dublin, Ireland on 15 July, 1831. The search for […]

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Real World Insight

Deakin University student Michelle Derrick writes about her recent internship at the Gold Museum. As part of the Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI) internship program, I was fortunate to take part in a paid collections and curatorial internship at the Gold Museum. For two days per week over eight weeks, I worked within two main […]

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Turning Learning into Practice

Deakin University student Natalie Carfora writes about her internship at the Gold Museum Now that I am nearing the end of my Master of Cultural Heritage, I am starting to think about applying for jobs. I spend a lot of time reading position descriptions and worrying about the competition. I recently saw a graduate internship […]

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German Cavalry Saddlebag

Horse Saddlebag, 1914-1918 World War One marked a transitional period in the use of the horse in warfare. Cavalry had limited use after 1914 on the Western Front, where entrenched positions, and extensive barbed wire and machine gun emplacements, prevented their traditional function of breaking up enemy infantry concentrations. After the Boer War (1899-1902) British […]

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